How DSCSA Changes the Licensing Landscape for Third-Party Logistics

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How DSCSA Changes the Licensing Landscape for Third-Party Logistics

Posted by Two Labs on January 10, 2018
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The Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA), passed in November 2013, has become a buzzword in the pharma industry in the past few years, and will continue to be until the completion of the implementation in 2023.  DSCSA describes creating an electronic, inter operable system that stores transaction information and history of a drug from the time of manufacture to when it is dispensed to a patient.

The big license earthquake came when the FDA defined what a Third-Party Logistics (3PL) company should be.  Before the passage of DSCSA, 3PL companies could be licensed as a wholesaler. The Wholesale and 3PL business models are similar: both company types accept products from manufacturers into their warehouses and then distribute them to customers. However, there is one major difference: the 3PL does not own the products that they are distributing. 

Because the 3PL does not take ownership of the product, the FDA decided that the 3PL should have its own category and can no longer be licensed as a wholesaler. As Federal law supersedes any state requirement, all 305 Third-Party Logistics locations listed by the FDA had state licenses that were now considered nullified.  

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The big question is: How are the 3PLs able to continue to do business in a state when all their licenses are no longer valid? This is an issue plaguing the industry.  Even the National Association Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) has been trying to help clarify. Feel free to check out their November/December issue of their publication, Innovations, page 7 where NABP leads a discussion forum to provide guidance to the wholesale industry.

As of December 2017, there are only 14 states that have established a specific license for a 3PL. This means the 3PL may continue to do business in the other 36 states (in addition to Washington, D.C.) without the requirement of a license. The state legislatures must decide for themselves whether a state will require a 3PL to hold a license, what the requirements will be, costs, etc. That small number of 14 states will both continue to grow and continue to change the landscape of licensing for pharmaceutical distribution over the next few years as the states make these decisions

Which 14 States  Require a License?

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Topics: 3PL, PharmaLicense, DSCSA